The UK’s First Plastic-Free Coffee Packaging – The Inside Story

Last week, Percol announced they were launching the UK’s first plastic-free coffee packaging, aiming to stop 1.3 million pieces of plastic ending up in landfill each year. Was it difficult to achieve? Is it good for business? What advice would they give to other trail-blazers who want to do the same? I had a coffee with Ollie Richmond, their Trade & NPD Manager, to percolate on some of these questions…

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Q. What’s the history of Percol Coffee?

Percol is a brand with a great story. We are proud to have been pioneering ethics and sustainability since we started back in 1987. We were the first ground coffee to earn the Fairtrade mark and the first to offer organic arabica. We’ve got a long history of making sure the people and environments that grow our coffee are supported, respected and protected. We’re now proud to launch the world’s first plastic-free packaging for ground coffee and beans.  

Q. How much plastic waste do coffee drinkers produce?

The takeaway coffee market has received a lot of negative press recently over the amount of non-recyclable waste it creates, and rightly so. People in the UK throw away 2.5 billion coffee cups a year, of which less than 1% get recycled! So, how is the coffee industry responding to an ever increasing drive to be sustainable, not only in coffee shops but in consumers’ kitchens? 

Over 100 million non-recyclable coffee packs are produced and used each year – you’ll notice the ‘not yet widely recycled’ OPRL symbol on the back of ground or beans coffee packs. As a UK retail coffee brand which sells more than 4 million products a year in supermarkets, we have an important role to play in reducing the impact we are making on the planet, and providing customers with more sustainable choices – without compromising on taste, quality or our ethical sourcing.

Q. Why is Percol Coffee going plastic-free now? Does it make business sense?

Like many, we want to do more to reduce the amount of packaging (and particularly plastic) that we’re using. So we’ve looked at all our products and have taken bold steps to find sustainable packaging alternatives, starting with our ground and beans. Ultimately our aim is to give customers a plastic-free option.

Being the first has meant taking risks and the new plastic-free ground and beans packaging is significantly more expensive than what we used previously. However, we were passionate that this was the right decision to take in order to reduce our impact on the planet.

Q. What were the biggest challenges to going plastic-free? What advice would you give to others who want to do the same?

There is no silver bullet. There will always be pros and cons to any alternative solution so it’s important to understand these and make an informed decision that you think is right for your business. The best solution to one type of packaging issue may not necessarily be the same for another. With that in mind, technology and innovation are constantly improving the options available – we’ve made a decision which we think is best at this point in time but we’re open to change if a better solution comes on to the market.

Q. Did you consider a circular economy model, where packaging could be returned to you and reused?

Our new plastic-free ground and beans packaging is certified home compostable. This means the customer can throw it in their local council food waste bin where it will be industrially composted and break down in 12 weeks. Alternatively, in their home compost bin it will break down in 26 weeks.  

We feel this is the best alternative to the multi-layer, non-recyclable plastic packs on the market. Composting is nature’s circular economy and compostable packaging, when organically recycled, is a true cradle to cradle solution. Our packaging – once broken down – can be used as a soil improver.

Q. What about all the people who don’t have food waste bins? What happens to your packaging if it ends up in landfill?

We would always strongly encourage our customers to put our new home compostable packaging in their local council food bin or home compost bin. If neither are available, we’d encourage you to speak to your local council about having a food waste bin put in place for your home. The UK sent 7.7million tonnes of Biodegradable Municipal Waste (BMW) to landfill in 2016* – this could be avoided through increased food waste collection.

If our home compostable packaging is put in your regular refuse bin, it will go through the local waste system where it’s likely to enter a landfill or an anaerobic digester. If landfilled, the packaging will act like organic waste – such as a banana peel – which may slowly break down but is likely to remain inert due to the lack of oxygen and moisture required to start bio-degradation. 

Q. Is the aim to differentiate Percol from its competitors, or would you like them to follow your lead?

By being the first in the market to launch compostable packaging, we expect this will differentiate us from our competitors. However, we hope others will ultimately follow or innovate in this area. We would encourage others in the coffee industry to be brave and invest in sustainable packaging solutions.

Q. How much plastic will this change save?

This move will strip out over 1.3 million pieces of plastic from our business, which equates to 2-3 tonnes of plastic a year. 

*(UK Statistics on Waste Statistical Notice October 2018)

Work Photo

 

 

Thanks to Ollie for answering all my questions!

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